2018 Remodeling Kitchen Flooring Choices

h1: Kitchen Flooring Choices for Your New Home or Kitchen Remodel
For homeowners in search of great new ideas for their kitchen remodel, a new floor is among the most important—and most left out—new things to add to the list. If you have been searching for great new kitchen flooring ideas, this article will help you decide which floor type is the best option for your home, budget, and needs.
When you search online or at brick and mortar storefronts for your next kitchen floor, you must keep installation cost, cost to maintain, durability and longevity, and style in mind. If you have enough money for travertine flooring, then by all means, go with that option. However, if you are among the millions of other homeowners who need a more affordable flooring, reviewing your options in laminate, ceramic, vinyl, linoleum, and concrete is a good idea. With prices ranges widely from $2–40 per foot, the choices may not be as easy to make as you thought. Give yourself plenty of time to make the decision that’s best for your future, your home, and your budget over the long-term.


h2: Newer Options in Kitchen Flooring
If you haven’t been shopping for kitchen flooring in the past 10 years or more, there are new kitchen flooring types you may not even be aware of. If you haven’t yet considered cork, bamboo, hardwood, or concrete, now is the time to review your updates choices.
h3: Cork
With widely varying prices from about $3–25 per foot, cork is a great option for homes where a lot of the action occurs in the kitchen. It’s easy on the feet, easy to clean, and liquid-repellant, making it the best option for those who do a lot of cooking and baking.
h3: Bamboo
Bamboo is easy on the budget when compared to other options like hardwood or travertine. It is also easy to clean, affordably managed, and easier on the feet than concrete or linoleum flooring.


h3: Hardwood
Hardwood flooring is certainly an attractive option for just about any kitchen type. At a cost of about $5–20 per square foot, and a yearly cost of about $250–500 to maintain (waxing, sanding, and resealing as needed for a clean appearance), it isn’t for everyone. It’s not as easy on the feet as cork or bamboo, and isn’t always easily cleaned. In homes that don’t have wood flooring in other rooms, a hardwood kitchen floor can look out of place.
h3: Concrete
At $2–10 per foot, concrete floors are very easy on the upfront budget, but can cost you more to maintain over the months and years ahead than cork, bamboo, linoleum, or laminate flooring. It’s also harder on the feet than other flooring types. However, concrete kitchen floors allow you to choose the design or style of your choice, and is usually pretty simply repainted and resealed.
h2: How to install a kitchen floor
When it comes to installing a new kitchen floor, some options are relatively simple to install, making them a good choice for DIY installers. However, options like travertine, hardwood, and linoleum generally require the professional tools of the trade and a contractor to complete installation. If you want to install your own kitchen floor, consider your choices in cork, bamboo, or laminate flooring, as these are typically easier to install than hardwood or travertine.
h2: Kitchen floor installation cost
The cost of installing a new kitchen floor varies tremendously. You can DIY your own concrete or laminate floor, but how much will you pay a contractor to install a new hardwood or other more difficult flooring type that require the know-how and tools? As a rule, you can expect to pay about $1500 up to around $5000, depending on the size of your kitchen, where you live (costs vary from one US state to another), and the type of flooring being installed. If you plan on installing a hardwood or travertine kitchen floor, be prepared to pay north of $4500.

h2: Kitchen floor installations in Georgia
Kitchen floor installations in Columbus, Georgia, are all about the options, from sustainable green kitchen floors like bamboo and cork to standard options like laminate and linoleum flooring. If you have a cook or chef in the house, consider what they will be walking around on before making up your mind. The best options for your next kitchen floor will depend on your overall interior design, your flooring or remodeling budget, and whether or not you plan on DIY flooring installation. For more information on installing your next kitchen floor, call Kennedy Kitchens and Baths in Columbus, Georgia today.

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  1. Poulin Home Design October 12, 2018 at 8:17 am - Reply

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